With a career spanning 20+ years, Summer Nilsson is a bestselling author, entrepreneur and CEO. Summer is nationally recognized for building global brands and developing purpose-driven partnerships and campaigns that change narratives. Summer has also represented the biggest names in publishing, fashion and the arts, including People, Food Network Magazine, ELLE, Who What Wear, House Beautiful, Brandon Maxwell, among others. Summer serves on the National Advisory Council for Girls’ Inc. and the marketing board for the AT&T Performing Arts Center.

Author's Purpose

We live in a digital world that enables communication among peers from all parts of the globe. It supports a seamless existence where touch points are intertwined. We engage with an all-access pass, knowing that admission isn’t free. The price we pay delves into the deepest layers of our psyche. We surrender to the permanence of digital documentation. Then we agree to receive unfiltered feedback from strangers while vying for their validation. We oftentimes sacrifice self-worth for shares in a computer-generated storyboard that will forever alter future generations.

For over two decades, I have built global brands alongside the best media and marketing minds in the country. I’ve launched national magazines, campaigns, apps, personalities, products and partnerships. As a marketing veteran, I have no issue living and creating in a digital existence. As an advisor and mentor, my concern lies in the lack of awareness among youth as to the permanent nature of their profiles. This is a space where photos write resumes and comments can make or break one’s self-esteem. Teenagers must be educated about the professional ramifications of their footprint, as well as the very real consequences of their comments. There is no delete button in a data-driven universe.

Eighty-seven percent of American teenagers own an iPhone. In 2020, TikTok became the most used app by American preteens and teens. Female users between the ages of 10 and 19 account for the largest user demographic. It is, therefore, worth noting that 55% of cyberbullying victims are between the ages of 14 and 15.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) and Children’s Hospital Association have declared a national emergency in children’s mental health. Citing the AAP, emergency visits for suspected suicide attempts increased 51% among girls ages 12-17 years in early 2021 compared to the same period in 2019.

For these reasons, and many more, I created Loodor. Teenagers are difficult to engage outside of their social network. It’s a nonstarter if the presentation and content aren’t deemed “cool”. The Loodor Tales Series integrates premium design, multi-dimensional characters, and cross-over humor to deliver life lessons with a message of positivity. The series supports social acceptance by addressing complex topics including ego and imposter syndrome. In a world of constant chatter, it is our duty to reinforce the importance of connection, confidence, and kindness.

The Loodor Tales Series has been called “Purpose-Driven”. The purpose of the series is to instill self-esteem and encourage empathy through engaging content and products. We also donate a portion of sales to organizations that place sheltered animals in loving homes. There are around 70 million stray animals in the U.S. Approximately 6.3 million companion animals enter U.S. shelters each year. A quarter of pets in shelters have been abandoned by their owners.

There was a time when one’s purpose defined the very core of their character. Not likes or shares. Purpose. Life always comes full circle.”

(Source: APnews, Statista, Cyberbullying Research Center, American Academy of Pediatrics, How-To-Geek, ASPCA, One Green Planet)

Author's Purpose

We live in a digital world that enables communication among peers from all parts of the globe. It supports a seamless existence where touch points are intertwined. We engage with an all-access pass, knowing that admission isn’t free. The price we pay delves into the deepest layers of our psyche. We surrender to the permanence of digital documentation. Then we agree to receive unfiltered feedback from strangers while vying for their validation. We oftentimes sacrifice self-worth for shares in a computer-generated storyboard that will forever alter future generations.

For over two decades, I have built global brands alongside the best media and marketing minds in the country. I’ve launched national magazines, campaigns, apps, personalities, products and partnerships. As a marketing veteran, I have no issue living and creating in a digital existence. As an advisor and mentor, my concern lies in the lack of awareness among youth as to the permanent nature of their profiles. This is a space where photos write resumes and comments can make or break one’s self-esteem. Teenagers must be educated about the professional ramifications of their footprint, as well as the very real consequences of their comments. There is no delete button in a data-driven universe.

Eighty-seven percent of American teenagers own an iPhone. In 2020, TikTok became the most used app by American preteens and teens. Female users between the ages of 10 and 19 account for the largest user demographic. It is, therefore, worth noting that 55% of cyberbullying victims are between the ages of 14 and 15.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) and Children’s Hospital Association have declared a national emergency in children’s mental health. Citing the AAP, emergency visits for suspected suicide attempts increased 51% among girls ages 12-17 years in early 2021 compared to the same period in 2019.

For these reasons, and many more, I created Loodor. Teenagers are difficult to engage outside of their social network. It’s a nonstarter if the presentation and content aren’t deemed “cool”. The Loodor Tales Series integrates premium design, multi-dimensional characters, and cross-over humor to deliver life lessons with a message of positivity. The series supports social acceptance by addressing complex topics including ego and imposter syndrome. In a world of constant chatter, it is our duty to reinforce the importance of connection, confidence, and kindness.

The Loodor Tales Series has been called “Purpose-Driven”. The purpose of the series is to instill self-esteem and encourage empathy through engaging content and products. We also donate a portion of sales to organizations that place sheltered animals in loving homes. There are around 70 million stray animals in the U.S. Approximately 6.3 million companion animals enter U.S. shelters each year. A quarter of pets in shelters have been abandoned by their owners.

There was a time when one’s purpose defined the very core of their character. Not likes or shares. Purpose. Life always comes full circle.”

(Source: APnews, Statista, Cyberbullying Research Center, American Academy of Pediatrics, How-To-Geek, ASPCA, One Green Planet)

AS FEATURED IN

Profiled among the "Authors I Admire"
by Kimberly Schlegel Whitman, TV Host and Editor-at-Large of Southern Living Magazine

Q&A with Summer Nilsson

SUMMER NILSSON: My grandfather, Bo, was the patriarch of our family. His word was his bond. A handshake superseded a signed agreement. He was wise and well-known as a visionary leader. However, in our family, my grandmother, Gwendolyn, was the unsung hero. She was a woman of faith and filled food baskets for families in need. She was as devoted to her community as she was to her home. And, like all southern women of that time, she never missed a standing appointment to get her “hair set” at the beauty salon. She was beloved by all, except on Saturdays.

On Saturdays, Gwendolyn hosted bridge (a card game), while serving finger sandwiches and freshly baked desserts. The sweet smell of pound cake misled many. Game days were not for the faint of heart.

When researching words for naming inspiration, I came across an old card game called Loo. My mother’s name is also Lou. Loo provided the perfect metaphor to honor the two women who shaped my life the most, my mother and grandmother.

SUMMER NILSSON: Like many, I believed that climbing a career ladder would provide fulfillment. I lost sight of the fact that happiness comes from within. I took time to reframe my definition of success. I then set out to share my story and instill that same inner strength in my nieces. My intention was to make sure they stayed true to themselves and felt empowered to succeed on their own terms. I uncovered an opportunity to create content on their terms. The Land of the Pines and The Land of the Strays are books for all ages, designed to capture a tween reader's creativity while fueling their growth. The stories are transformative and written to act as a guidepost for the next generation of mindful leaders.

SUMMER NILSSON: The honest answer is that I’m more of an animal person than a people person. I’ve always felt a connection to animals, and it’s been a lifelong goal to build a brand that could be leveraged to assist them. By writing books with animal characters, I created an authentic platform and foundation from which to help sheltered animals find loving homes.

SUMMER NILSSON: My hometown, Daingerfield, has a population of 2,600 and three traffic lights. I often joke that there are no secrets in a small town. Stories seem to get better with time, and small towns are rooted in gifted storytellers. I learned the art of a good tale in East Texas. I also developed an appreciation for basic kindness and simple pleasures. A smile goes a long way, as does a cup of Sonic ice and a gentle breeze on a balmy, summer night.

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